News: Realmax Claims Crown of Widest Field of View for an AR Headset at CES

Realmax Claims Crown of Widest Field of View for an AR Headset at CES

Shanghai-based Realmax is introducing the crowds at CES to the Realmax Qian, an augmented reality headset capable of a field of view (FoV) that topples anything available on the market today.

Realmax claims 100.8 degrees FoV, surpassing Dreamworld's Dream Glass headset at 100 degrees, and Meta Company's Meta 2, which boasts 90 degrees.

"The Realmax Qian represent a technical breakthrough in delivering mobile, massive field-of-view, wearable Augmented Reality glasses at a compelling price point," said Nigel Burton, CTO of Realmax, in a company statement. However, without unassisted testing of the device, the company's claim of widest FoV is something we'll have to wait to definitively confirm independently.

Image by Nigel Burton/Twitter

Burton also shared an image of the device from the floor of CES on Twitter. The image corroborates reports from The Verge that the device is only a prototype at this point.

In addition to previewing Qian, Realmax is debuting its own content creation platform. The platform was built in partnership with the creators of ARToolkit, an open-source, web-based tool that enables developers to easily design AR experiences that are viewable on Qian, Apple's ARKit, and Google's ARCore, as well as any smartphone, tablet, or laptop.

"Realmax Studio will allow educators, retailers, entertainment companies and all types of creators to deliver beautiful and sophisticated augmented reality experiences to a potential audience of billions," said Burton.

While the company's current AR offerings focus on enterprises via its Realwear division, Realmax CEO Jackie Yu has high hopes for the technology, and envisions AR experiences that could bring new opportunities for learning to students worldwide.

"With the Realmax Qian, cellists who aspire to become the next Yo-Yo Ma can practice the cello as if the maestro himself was guiding their hand," said Yu. "Students from remote locations can experiment with an industrial robot, or explore the atomic elements of a molecule, without the costs of expensive laboratory hardware. Making such learning available to everyone is a significant motivator for everyone in our team."

Cover image via Realmax

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